Capability Statement (1 page)

Capability Statement (5 pages)

 

 




Current Multiple Award
Task Order Contracts:

USPFO for Tennessee 
W912L7-10-D-0008
 
USACE, Kansas City District 
W912DQ-11-R-4012

USPFO for Arkansas
W912JF-14-D-0015 

USPFO for Missouri
W912NS-14-D-0024

USPFO for Mississippi
W9127Q-14-D-0015

Awards
LEED Silver -- cert_mark_silv_gray.jpg
  • LEED for New Construction awarded January 2015


Location: Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo.
Size: 8,725 sq. ft.
Complete: May 2014
Owner: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Logistics Readiness Squadron Facility


LEED Silver Certified (View Credits)


J&S Construction completed construction of its first contract for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District -- an 8,725 square-foot Logistics Readiness Squadron (LRS) facility at Whiteman Air Force Base, located 70 miles southeast of Kansas City, Mo.

The LRS facility is an operations center for preparing military personnel for deployments overseas, as well as redeployments back to the states. This $3.4 million project is the first pairing between J&S Construction and Whiteman Air Force Base, host unit of the 509th Bomb Wing (509 BW). The 509 BW operates the B-2 Spirit Stealth Bomber, designed to be employed to strike high-value targets that are either out of range of conventional aircraft or considered to be too heavily defended for conventional aircraft to strike without a high risk of loss.

“This project was initially over the allotted budget and required extensive negotiations with the Corps to get the contract amount down to the available funds,” said Jack Stites, President of J&S Construction. “The Corps expressed great satisfaction with J&S’ ability to meet its budget requirements and the way in which we approached the process. We utilize this approach with many of our projects in the private sector, and we are just glad to be a part of such a unique project.”  

A firm-fixed price contract, this facility is LEED Silver Certified through USGBC. Environmentally Friendly features designed into the building included 50 percent reduction in construction waste, reduced stormwater runoff, 32 percent reduction in water usage, 36 percent reduction in energy usage, as well as 20 percent of materials being made up of recycled content.  

Site amenities include gravel parking, sidewalks and concrete paving with new bronze-tinted, insulated, blast resistant windows, metal wall panels, brick wainscot, standing seam metal roof and an environmentally-friendly air tight facility. The shell of the building consists of continuous and spread footings, slab on grade, exterior Insulated Concrete Form (ICF) walls, structural steel framing, light gauge metal trusses, standing seam metal roof and traditional metal building panel siding.

Interior work consists of stained concrete, carpet tile, porcelain tile, light gauge metal stud and drywall partitions, acoustical ceiling tile and gypsum board ceilings, aluminum and hollow metal frames wood doors, glazing, overhead door, toilet partitions and toilet accessories, plumbing, mechanical, electrical and communications.

“Energy-efficient design and construction is becoming the ‘norm’ in both the private and government sectors,” said Stites.